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Forge  |  Everything Forge  |  Forge Progress - Melting Pot  |  Topic: Blacksmiths Book of Schematics Fun!
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Da_Duke2000
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« Reply #15 on: August 11, 2010, 08:36:31 PM »

Your question is valid, and we toyed around with it for some time.

Weavers are the ones who have transcended the limits of physical material with the Distaff. For another Guild to have an identical magical ability (and for the most part the same powers, and 'limitations') seemed like a cop-out for a sequel.

The Weavers, used a Distaff (also a tool for spinning) to weave patterns, into reality. All of this stems from a theology of cloth, fabric, and patterns. And the Weavers were free to refine their art, isolated on the Island of Loom.

However, Rusty is a Blacksmith, and of the Guild of Blacksmiths. The origins of the Gauntlets, and their powers should have the same theology behind it. For this reason we have written the Gauntlets introduction:


"In the height of Blacksmith mastery these Sparks were engineered to reflect the sum of knowledge the Guild had gathered. For every metalworking technique or property the Blacksmiths have conquered, there also exists a relative Schematic to detail the process. Blueprints if you will.

Thus, the Sparks, through the Gauntlets, are a method to unleashing these Schematics and their effect at a whim. Tempering, Luster, Resonance, Forming... Techniques an artisan would spend a lifetime practicing could be reproduced by a novice in an instant of metaphysical splendor. However, the consequences of their achievement were immediate. The demand for true skilled labor declined... unemployment culminated in revolt...and intercontinental society was not willing to tolerate such an imbalance of power between the Guilds.

Inevitably, the use of the Gauntlets was prohibited and all pairs were ordered to be destroyed by the council at Elstree. It seems though that at least one pair has survived..."


Mundane can be one thing
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Unai
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« Reply #16 on: January 26, 2011, 06:49:13 AM »

Remanence Schematic: Blacksmiths noted long ago that hammering a cooling iron bar would turn it into a magnet for a short time. The hammering had to be done in a certain direction, and the magnetic remanence would fade off quickly. Blacksmith were able to recreate this effect in a schematic, and it proved to be very useful to grab metal objects, even with its short duration. There is also a way to turn iron into a permanent magnet, but such a complicated schematic is beyond the scope of this book.

I'm not sure of what Schematics you already have, but a quick wikipedia search sugegsts:

Forge techniques: drawing, shrinking, bending, upsetting, and punching.
Also, of course, welding.


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Da_Duke2000
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« Reply #17 on: January 27, 2011, 09:35:35 PM »

Remanence is not one I came across in my own searches. Thank you very much for the comment Smiley.
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Unai
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« Reply #18 on: February 04, 2011, 06:22:56 AM »

Here's another I found while researching some old Blacksmith books Cheesy

Excuse me if the english is not perfect, I had to translate the Schematic!!

Casting Schematic: Casting is used when the form of the desired object is too complicated to be reproduced by forging. It requieres the creation of a mold, then pouring the liquid metal in it and letting it solidify. The casting schematics allows the shape of an object to be reproduced, just like with casting, but without having to create a mold before. The casted object is usually rougher than the original object and needs finishing. Casting object from other castings will produce low quality pieces.
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cuchulainn
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« Reply #19 on: December 05, 2013, 05:30:50 AM »

Red Heating: The schematic was used to be able to forge without a fire. When used, the metal goes red hot. Iron forged this way is called ironically "cold iron" and has magical propierties (can damage ghosts and undead). Some lesser metals melt like lava when this spell is cast upon them. Has no reverse.

Dyeing: This spell was picked up from the weavers during the war of 5889, when King Anvil Morningmace decided to dye his armor to make him more distinguishable in battle. Though supposedly there was a time where you could dye in any existing color, now the spell only works with shining green.

Sword in a bottle: This schematic can turn any metal object (a sword, a helmet or a cage) into embers and ashes; that can be kept in bottles or boxes. The utility of the spell is that is reversible, and may be useful if you want to hide an object from an unwanted view; or maybe getting weapons inside an official act.
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abisso
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« Reply #20 on: December 17, 2013, 04:47:46 PM »

Sorry for the late reply, but you know better than anyone how the last days have been intense with work!

Thanks for the tips: the first one is in the list of the possible usable schematics, actually. As per the other two, I like the Dyeing one the most, not only because it mimics the homonymous one known by the Weavers, but also because of its description.
"Sword in a bottle" sounds a bit too "D&D" style instead, and it's quite distant from something achievable with metal-working to really fit.

Still, thanks for the suggestions, and for reviving a thread that should definitely be used more by the members. Did you hear me, little weavers?!?!? Cheesy
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